Pepper, Pink

$20.00$35.00

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Description

Schinus terebinthifolius

Pain-relieving and euphoric, the tropical fruity notes shadow the dominant spicy notes present in this exotic oil.  A lovely addition to your essential oil cabinet.

– antibacterial
– euphoric (vaporized)
– insect repellent
– mood elevating
– pain-relief
– anti-inflammatory (? – subjective results, not documented in literature)

Dr. Nick Notes

Pink pepper, also known as Peruvian pepper or Californian pepper tree is native to the Andes of Peru and has been used medicinally as an antimicrobial and to make a fermented beverage by Inca civilization for at least 1500 years. Pink pepper is unrelated to piper species (e.g. black pepper – piper nigrum) but is called a pepper due to the pepper-like appearance of the dried berries as well as spicy aroma.

Pink pepper is quite unique, offering a mix of exotic spice that is quite therapeutic with a limited scope.  My favorite personal usage of pink pepper through vaporization, I find that this EO is reasonably psychoactive/euphoric.  It's quite pronounced and highly functional without a cloudiness to the experience.  Sometimes I'll infuse drop(s) into beverages or foods and find that it adds nice value in similar ways listed above.  In the past, I've used this EO topically for muscle soreness, mild-medium levels of pain as an analgesic undiluted on the skin and found it to be quite effective.  This has not been well documented or studied in the literature for pain use, but should be looked at for practical application further.

The primary terpene constituent found in pink pepper essential oil, α-phellandrene, has been shown in rodents to have a pain blocking effect in rodents by many different mechanisms including opioid, glutamatergic, nitric oxide, cholinergic and adrenergic neurotransmitter systems involved in pain circuitry (Lima 2012). This may help explain pink pepper’s pain-relieving effects when used topically and have had success reported for relief of knee in the past.

How to Use

  • For pain relief try 5 drops in 1 teaspoon (5ml) of carrier oil = ~5%. Possibly more effective in higher concentrations.
  • Can also be mixed into pain-relief blends/formulas.
  • Inhale 1 drop in the Essential VAAAPP: Has significant mood uplifting and euphoric effects ~ seems to be a full body/mind euphoria without “cloudy” perception.
  • May be used in food and beverages although dilution is required ~ try 1 drop in 8-16 oz water/club soda/salad dressing and mix well!
  • A nice unique addition to botanical perfumery (known as Redberry in perfumery industry)
  • Add into anti-microbial solutions
  • Diffuse around the house or environment for a soft, mood-enhancing experience that doubles as an insect repellent.

Safety Summary

Hazards: None known.
Contraindications: None known.

Cultivation: Unsprayed | Organic
Country of Origin: Madagascar
Parts of Plant Used: Peppercorn

Constituent Range (Lawrence 1997e p. 76-78)
β-Myrcene (5.0 – 20.4%)
α-Phellandrene (5.3 – 17.3%)
p-Cymene (2.9 – 11.5%)
δ-Cadinene (4.7 – 9.1%)
(+)-Limonene (7.2 – 9.0%)
β-Phellandrene (4.8 – 7.2%)
α-Cadinol (0.2 – 6.6%)
Viridiflorol (0 – 6.5%)
α-Cadinene (0 – 3.8%)
Spathulenol (0 – 3.6%)
α-Pinene (1.4 – 3.1%)
α-Caryophyllene (0.6 – 3.0%)
T-Cadinol (0.7 – 2.5%)
Germacrene D (tr – 2.4%)
T-Muurulol (0.2 – 2.3%)
β-Caryophyllene (0.3 – 2.0%)
α-Muurolene (tr – 1.5%)
Elemol (0.2 – 1.3%)
Terpinen-4-ol (0 – 1.3%)

This information was documented by Lawrence 1997e p. 76-78 published by Robert Tisserand & Rodney Young in 2013 and is posted to demonstrate some general range of chemical constituents of this essential oil.  Each distillation & plant source varies and current batch will likely have some variance to the information published above.  When possible, we will post current GC-MS analysis separately for our oils sold on this site, correlating with batch numbers for your enjoyment & awareness.

References

Martins Mdo R, Arantes S, Candeias F, Tinoco MT, Cruz-Morais J. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and toxicological properties of Schinus molle L. essential oils. J Ethnopharmacol. 2014 Jan 10;151(1):485-92. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2013.10.063. Epub 2013 Nov 11.

Bendaoud H, Romdhane M, Souchard JP, Cazaux S, Bouajila J. Chemical composition and anticancer and antioxidant activities of Schinus molle L. and Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi berries essential oils. J Food Sci. 2010 Aug 1;75(6):C466-72. doi: 10.1111/j.1750-3841.2010.01711.x.

de Mendonça Rocha PM, Rodilla JM, Díez D, Elder H, Guala MS, Silva LA, Pombo EB. Synergistic antibacterial activity of the essential oil of aguaribay (Schinus molle L.). Molecules. 2012 Oct 12;17(10):12023-36. doi: 10.3390/molecules171012023.

Lima DF, Brandão MS, Moura JB, Leitão JM, Carvalho FA, Miúra LM, Leite JR, Sousa DP, Almeida FR. Antinociceptive activity of the monoterpene α-phellandrene in rodents: possible mechanisms of action. J Pharm Pharmacol. 2012 Feb;64(2):283-92. doi: 10.1111/j.2042-7158.2011.01401.x. Epub 2011 Dec 8.

Abdel-Sattar E, Zaitoun AA, Farag MA, Gayed SH, Harraz FM. Chemical composition, insecticidal and insect repellent activity of Schinus molle L. leaf and fruit essential oils against Trogoderma granarium and Tribolium castaneum. Nat Prod Res. 2010 Feb;24(3):226-35. doi: 10.1080/14786410802346223.

Additional information

Size

5 mL, 15 mL

Extraction Method

CO2 Extract, Steam Distilled

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